Original Wall Art Photographs and Canvases

The favourite photos

  • Poppy Hill

    The 60 acre field should be filled with blue linseed, but because the sprays didn't work, poppies grew instead. Royston, Hertfordshire, UK

  • Poppies at The Tower

    This Black and Photograph with red spot colour was taken amongst the thousands of visitors at the Tower of London on 2nd November 2014. The huge art installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red at the Tower of London, marked one hundred years since the first full day of Britain's involvement in World War One. Created by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper, 888,246 ceramic poppies progressively filled the Tower's famous moat between 17 July and 11 November 2014. Each poppy represented a British military fatality during the First World War. Monochrome with red really adds drama to the scene.

  • The Shard London

    This long exposure black and white image features The Shard at London Bridge which is currently the tallest building in the European Union. The glass-clad pyramidal tower has 72 habitable floors, with a viewing gallery and open-air observation deck on the 72nd floor, at a height of 244.3 metres (802 ft)

  • Silent Blue

    The Lighthouse on Dovercourt's shore in Essex UK was built in 1863 as one of a pair after the two Lighthouses at Harwich. This is a long exposure of over 8 minutes.

  • Dovercourt Lighthouse

    The on Dovercourt's shore was built in 1863 as one of a pair after the two Lighthouses at Harwich, which worked on a similar principal of being aligned by the mariner to mark safe passage had become inaccurate and dangerously misleading. The two iron towers were built by Trinity House to aid navigation into the River Orwell on which the busy ports of Felixstowe and Harwich are located. The impressive 6 Legged tower is painted black and is 14 metres in height. The light, which shone from an enclosed lantern similar to those installed on Lighthouses designed by James Walker, exhibited a fixed white, marking safe passage into the ports of Harwich and Felixstowe until 1917, at which point both Lighthouses were discontinued. After being extinguished, both of the Dovercourt Lighthouses fell into disrepair and were only restored in 1988

  • Never the twain shall meet - The Gherkin London

    A shot of The Gherkin 30 St Mary Axe (widely known informally as The Gherkin and previously as the Swiss Re Building) is a commercial skyscraper in London's primary financial district, the City of London. It was completed in December 2003 and opened in April 2004.With 41 storeys, it is 180 metres (591 ft) tall and stands on the former site of the Baltic Exchange, which was extensively damaged in 1992 by the explosion of a bomb placed by the Provisional IRA in St Mary Axe, the street from which the tower takes its name.

  • Southwold Pier, Suffolk

    Nice and Calm! A long exposure photograph of the Pier at Southwold Suffolk. The exposure of almost 300 seconds makes the sea appear flat and calm. The rusty pier legs add to the drama of the image.

  • Big Ben through the Arch Canon EOS Forum, Black and White picture of the year 2016.

    Canon EOS Forum, Black and White picture of the year 2016. A black and white image of Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament. The Arch is on the South Bank and leads to a passage way under Westminster Bridge.

  • Birds in Hand

    Birds in Hand is a statue in Kusadasi City (Turkey) – it’s often described as the hand of peace. The town's name meaning 'Bird Island' is taken from the island was a much-frequented resting place of birds during seasonal migrations.

  • Tarn Hows

    Tarn Hows is an area of the Lake District National Park, containing a picturesque tarn, approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) northeast of Coniston and about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) northwest of Hawkshead. It is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the area with over half a million visitors per year in the 1970s and is managed by the National Trust. Tarn Hows is fed at its northern end by a series of valley and basin mires and is drained by Tom Gill which cascades down over several small waterfalls to Glen Mary bridge: named by John Ruskin who felt that Tom Gill required a more picturesque name and so gave the area the title 'Glen Mary'.

  • Scotney Castle Kent

    Scotney Castle is an English country house with formal gardens south-east of Lamberhurst in the valley of the River Bewl in Kent, England. It belongs to the National Trust. The gardens, which are a celebrated example of the Picturesque style, are open to the public. The central feature is the ruins of a medieval, moated manor house, Scotney Old Castle, which is on an island on a small lake. The lake is surrounded by sloping, wooded gardens with fine collections of rhododendrons, azaleas and kalmia for spring colour, summer wisteria and roses, and spectacular autumn colour. At the top of the garden stands a house which was built to replace the Old Castle between 1835 and 1843. This is known as Scotney New Castle, or simply Scotney Castle, and was designed by Anthony Salvin. It is an early, and unusually restrained, example of Tudor Revival architectural style in 19th century Britain. Following the death of the resident, Elizabeth Hussey, in 2006, this house was opened to the public for the first time on 6 June 2007

  • Scotney Castle over the moat

    Scotney Castle is an English country house with formal gardens south-east of Lamberhurst in the valley of the River Bewl in Kent, England. It belongs to the National Trust. The gardens, which are a celebrated example of the Picturesque style, are open to the public. The central feature is the ruins of a medieval, moated manor house, Scotney Old Castle, which is on an island on a small lake. The lake is surrounded by sloping, wooded gardens with fine collections of rhododendrons, azaleas and kalmia for spring colour, summer wisteria and roses, and spectacular autumn colour. At the top of the garden stands a house which was built to replace the Old Castle between 1835 and 1843. This is known as Scotney New Castle, or simply Scotney Castle, and was designed by Anthony Salvin. It is an early, and unusually restrained, example of Tudor Revival architectural style in 19th century Britain. Following the death of the resident, Elizabeth Hussey, in 2006, this house was opened to the public for the first time on 6 June 2007.

  • Scotney Castle

    Scotney Castle is an English country house with formal gardens south-east of Lamberhurst in the valley of the River Bewl in Kent, England. It belongs to the National Trust. The gardens, which are a celebrated example of the Picturesque style, are open to the public. The central feature is the ruins of a medieval, moated manor house, Scotney Old Castle, which is on an island on a small lake. The lake is surrounded by sloping, wooded gardens with fine collections of rhododendrons, azaleas and kalmia for spring colour, summer wisteria and roses, and spectacular autumn colour. At the top of the garden stands a house which was built to replace the Old Castle between 1835 and 1843. This is known as Scotney New Castle, or simply Scotney Castle, and was designed by Anthony Salvin. It is an early, and unusually restrained, example of Tudor Revival architectural style in 19th century Britain. Following the death of the resident, Elizabeth Hussey, in 2006, this house was opened to the public for the first time on 6 June 2007.

  • Bodiam Castle Sussex

    Now looked after by The National Trust Bodiam Castle is a 14th-century moated castle near Robertsbridge in East Sussex, England. It was built in 1385 by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, a former knight of Edward III, with the permission of Richard II, ostensibly to defend the area against French invasion during the Hundred Years' War. Of quadrangular plan, Bodiam Castle has no keep, having its various chambers built around the outer defensive walls and inner courts. Its corners and entrance are marked by towers, and topped by crenellations. Its structure, details and situation in an artificial watery landscape indicate that display was an important aspect of the castle's design as well as defence. It was the home of the Dalyngrigge family and the centre of the manor of Bodiam.

  • Bodiam Castle - high contrast edit

    Now looked after by The National Trust Bodiam Castle is a 14th-century moated castle near Robertsbridge in East Sussex, England. It was built in 1385 by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, a former knight of Edward III, with the permission of Richard II, ostensibly to defend the area against French invasion during the Hundred Years' War. Of quadrangular plan, Bodiam Castle has no keep, having its various chambers built around the outer defensive walls and inner courts. Its corners and entrance are marked by towers, and topped by crenellations. Its structure, details and situation in an artificial watery landscape indicate that display was an important aspect of the castle's design as well as defence. It was the home of the Dalyngrigge family and the centre of the manor of Bodiam.

  • Hitch Woods Hertfordshire 2016

    ...and then there was light

  • Blue Bell Wood

    A 'Tone Mapped' image of a Blue Bell Wood in Hertfordshire UK. Blue Bells appear for such a short time in the spring. This colourful photograph of Blue Bells which are a protected species in the UK shows them at their full splendour.

  • The Old Naval College Greenwich

    Heritage Site in Greenwich, London, described by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) as being of "outstanding universal value" and reckoned to be the "finest and most dramatically sited architectural and landscape ensemble in the British Isles". The Cutty Sark ship can be seen to the right.

  • Albert Bridge

    River Thames London. The Albert Bridge is a road bridge over the River Thames in West London, connecting Chelsea on the north bank to Battersea on the south bank. Designed and built by Rowland Mason Ordish in 1873 as an Ordish–Lefeuvre system modified cable-stayed bridge, it proved to be structurally unsound, so between 1884 and 1887 Sir Joseph Bazalgette incorporated some of the design elements of a suspension bridge. In 1973 the Greater London Council added two concrete piers, which transformed the central span into a simple beam bridge. As a result, today the bridge is an unusual hybrid of three different design styles. It is an English Heritage Grade II listed building.

  • Southwold Pier

    An even more dramatic long exposure photograph of the Pier at Southwold Suffolk processed as a black and white photograph with low contrast background. . The exposure of almost 300 seconds makes the sea appear flat and calm. The rusty pier legs add to the drama of the monochrome image which is on the wall as a large format print in our house.

  • Resting Bird, long exposure seascape

    Using a neutral density filter the exposure on this image was 21 seconds. That was enough to produce a seascape with the feeling of motion in the waves. This coastal photograph was taken at Southwold in Suffolk. It would look great as a large wall art print.

  • Southwold Big Sky

    The English seaside town of Southwold is located on the East Coast. This monochrome image was taken from the pier looking back towards Southwold. It was a stormy January day and with a little post processing it makes a fabulous black and white photograph of the town. For a unique wall art choose a panoramic picture size for a dramatic image.

  • All calm at Southwold.

    All calm at Southwold is a long exposure seascape photograph. Just 13 seconds of long exposure was enough to add drama and movement to this coastal scene. A fabulous wall art!

  • Fishing in Turkey

    Fisherman enjoying the evening sunset in Kusadasi Turkey

  • The Spinning Eye

    The London Eye. The London Eye is a giant Ferris wheel on the South Bank of the River Thames in London. Also known as the Millennium Wheel, its official name was originally published as the British Airways London Eye. The entire structure is 135 metres (443 ft) tall and the wheel has a diameter of 120 metres (394 ft). When erected in 1999 it was the world's tallest Ferris wheel. The longer exposure creates the blur in the wheel.

  • The Old Naval College Greenwich

    Heritage Site in Greenwich, London, described by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) as being of "outstanding universal value" and reckoned to be the "finest and most dramatically sited architectural and landscape ensemble in the British Isles". The Cutty Sark ship can be seen to the right.

  • Tulip Staircase

    The Queen's House, construction of which started in 1616, is now part of the National Maritime Museum Greenwich London. The elegant Tulip Stairs are the first geometric self-supporting spiral staircase in the UK. Although called the 'tulip' stairs, it is thought that the flowers in the wrought-iron balustrade are actually fleurs-de-lis.

  • Tower Bridge - open for business

    A long exposure shot of a raised Tower Bridge. Tower Bridge (built 1886–1894) is a combined bascule and suspension bridge in London. The bridge crosses the River Thames close to the Tower of London and has become an iconic symbol of London. Tower Bridge is one of five London bridges now owned and maintained by the Bridge House Estates, a charitable trust overseen by the City of London Corporation.

  • The Houses of Parliament

    A long exposure image of the Houses of Parliament taken from the Golden Jubilee foot bridge.

  • Tower Bridge London - The Navy are in Port

    A long exposure photograph looking across the River Thames towards Tower Bridge. Tower Bridge (built 1886–1894) is a combined bascule and suspension bridge in London, England which crosses the River Thames. It is close to the Tower of London, from which it takes its name, and has become an iconic symbol of London. The tallest building in Europe, The Shard, can be seen in the background.

  • Westminster London Houses of Parliament

    A shot from the south side of Westminster Bridge London looking across The River Thames to The Houses of Parliament. A Wide Angle Long Exposure image using a Lee Filters 10 stop neutral density filter. The sort of image often works best as Black and White.

  • The Spinning Wheel, the London Eye

    A long exposure black and white photograph of The London Eye. The London Eye is a giant Ferris wheel on the South Bank of the River Thames in London. Also known as the Millennium Wheel, its official name was originally published as the British Airways London Eye. The entire structure is 135 metres (443 ft) tall and the wheel has a diameter of 120 metres (394 ft). When erected in 1999 it was the world's tallest Ferris wheel. The Houses of Parliament and Big Ben can be seen also.

  • Down on the beach - London style

    A long exposure black and white shot from Bermondsey looking back towards The Tower of London

  • Tower Bridge

    A long exposure shot of Tower Bridge. Tower Bridge (built 1886–1894) is a combined bascule and suspension bridge in London. The bridge crosses the River Thames close to the Tower of London and has become an iconic symbol of London. Tower Bridge is one of five London bridges now owned and maintained by the Bridge House Estates, a charitable trust overseen by the City of London Corporation.

  • Docklands

    A monochrome long exposure image looking across Blackwall Basin in London Docklands. A long exposure photograph with adjustments to the tone and contrast that helps Canary Wharf and the other sky scrapers stand out. I think it works well as a black and white image.

  • Lloyds of London

    This photograph is of the Lloyd's building in The City of London. It is sometimes known as the Inside-Out Building and is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior. Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by English Heritage to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".

  • Abstract in the Sky - More London

    This photograph is from More London which is a development on the south bank of the River Thames, immediately south-west of Tower Bridge in London. The southern exit is on Tooley Street. It includes the City Hall, a sunken amphitheatre called The Scoop, office blocks, shops, restaurants, cafes, and a pedestrianized area containing open-air sculptures and water features.

  • Ready for Harvest

    This summer corn field was photographed from a low angle to show the head of corn reaching for the sky! The corn was ready for harvest and the photograph with its saturated colours is a perfect image of summer.

  • Sunset over corn

    This photograph of a sunset was captured on a hill in Hertfordshire England. It is actually two images captured seconds apart from the same view point and then brought together in Photoshop. The BBC have used the image on their New in Pictures web site. The warm colours really depict summer.

  • Whitby Abbey

    A tone mapped or HDR conversion of a picture of Whitby Abbey. The saturated colours high produce a warm image. Whitby Abbey at the edge of the North York Moors was founded in 657 AD by the Saxon King of Northumbria, Oswy (Oswiu) as Streanshalh (Streonshalh). The name Streoneshalh is thought to signify Fort Bay or Tower Bay in reference to a supposed Roman settlement or Roman Signal Station that previously existed on the site.

  • Whitby Abbey, North Yorkshire UK

    This colour Image of Whitby Abbey with the reflection in the water adds to the drama of the image. Whitby Abbey at the edge of the North York Moors was founded in 657 AD by the Saxon King of Northumbria, Oswy (Oswiu) as Streanshalh (Streonshalh). The name Streoneshalh is thought to signify Fort Bay or Tower Bay in reference to a supposed Roman settlement or Roman Signal Station that previously existed on the site.

  • Whitby Abbey, North Yorkshire

    Whitby Abbey at the edge of the North York Moors was founded in 657 AD by the Saxon King of Northumbria, Oswy (Oswiu) as Streanshalh (Streonshalh). The name Streoneshalh is thought to signify Fort Bay or Tower Bay in reference to a supposed Roman settlement or Roman Signal Station that previously existed on the site.

  • Whitby Abbey black and white

    A powerful monochrome conversion of an image of Whitby Abbey. The high contrast black and white processing and the reflection in the water adds to the drama of the image. Whitby Abbey at the edge of the North York Moors was founded in 657 AD by the Saxon King of Northumbria, Oswy (Oswiu) as Streanshalh (Streonshalh). The name Streoneshalh is thought to signify Fort Bay or Tower Bay in reference to a supposed Roman settlement or Roman Signal Station that previously existed on the site.

  • Inside Bolton Abbey

    A high contrast black and white image from within Bolton Abbey which is in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales on the banks of the River Wharfe. It takes its name from the ruins of the 12th-century Augustinian monastery. The monochrome portrait format shows the ruined arch perfectly.

  • Bolton Abbey

    This black and white image was processed with an Infra Red effect. It shows the grave of Fred Trueman the England and Yorkshire fast bowler. The grave is next to Bolton Abbey which is in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales on the banks of the River Wharfe. It takes its name from the ruins of the 12th-century Augustinian monastery.

  • Stormy skies over Lavender

    A powerful monochrome image of a stormy summer sky. A black and white photograph best depicted the scene of the impending storm. A large print will show the drama!

  • Balloon time

    Filling a Hot Air Balloon for one last summer flight.

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